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News Update: Feb. 2012: Conwy Cabinet have decided to allow unrestricted cycling on Llandudno promenade for a trial period of one year. See News Snippet.

Cycling on Llandudno Promenade - Promising News and an explanation   -   June 2006

    The good news first. Conwy County Borough Council's Environment Scrutiny Committee agreed on the Feb 16th 2006 to recommend to Cabinet that Llandudno Promenade be used as part of a spinal extension to Route 5 of the National Cycle Network. This would proceed along a track delineated on the prom by simple broken lines from its current terminal position near the children's bathing pool on North Shore to Prince Edward Square. From that axis position (which gives access to the Great Orme also) the favoured route to West Shore would be directly along Gloddaeth Avenue. There has been vigorous opposition from certain quarters, and what seems remarkable is that this has not taken any account of the immense benefits the bicycle will bring to the town.

Cyclist being closely overtaken by heavy traffic on Llandudno's coast road

If your children, parents or grandparents were cycling along Llandudno's North Shore, where would you prefer them to be in current traffic conditions? Sorry, no bike prizes for the obvious!

The scrutiny committee received three 15 minute presentations. The first was from a Mike Pritchard representing a protest group which sees cycling as a threat to the town centre promenade as well as to the annual Red Arrows Aerobatics Display! No, don't ask the editor to explain the logic behind that notion - you'd better ask Mike Pritchard. He also attempted to make a case for the route to avoid the attractive and popular North Shore promenade and its Pier altogether - again, ask him the reason for that. Mike's presentation was followed by Glyn Evans, North Wales Sustrans Manager, who provided an overview of the National Route as a whole and the many positive implications for Llandudno. After this your editor, Roy Spilsbury, spoke for 15 minutes, with illustrations, of the sort of people now choosing to travel to the area to use the bicycle in the safe conditions that the coastal route provides. He also showed a photo of the traffic on North Shore Parade, which makes it such an intimidating road for any other than experienced cyclists, and also demonstrated why it is imperative that the wide promenade should be used for cycling.

Wide, empty promenade at Llandudno

Llandudno promenade

The anti-cyclist lobby seemed to have difficulty understanding that cyclists and pedestrians very quickly adapt to shared-use space and that conventions of passage develop respecting the needs and comfort of others. This has been confirmed by the absence of any complaints of conflict on Conwy's shared-use routes and those of the adjoining county of Denbighshire.

    So in the hope of an early decision by the Cabinet to adopt the Scrutiny Committee's recommendations in the not too distant future, we would expect to see the North Shore linked to the West Shore Estuary Path, which is currently under construction to the sound of the dumping of rocks on the foreshore and the clanking of the cranes bedding them into position. Beethoven never sounded sweeter!

    And now the explanation. Our website visitors have become accustomed to the site being loaded with new goodies every three or four days. It is almost 14 days since the last loading. This has been due to the involvement by your editor and webmaster virtually on a daily basis with matters connected with urgent cycling issues. These are unlikely to ease in the immediate future, but we do hope there will be an improvement in the frequency of loading.

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